Looking back and looking forward from 2011


This year marks the four hundredth aniversary of one of the biggest game changers in Christendom’s history. Perhaps you’re looking forward to the new NIV of 2011 which harvested the digital linguistic analysis techniques used by Collins dictionary. Or rather, you may be happy with your Crossway ESV which you can now read offline for free on your iPhone or Android phone with the apps that Crossway have provided. Today, technology takes our Bible translation beyond the reaches it has ever had yet, four hundred years ago, a far more remarkable thing happened that still influences Bible translations today. King James commissioned the “Authorized Version” (also known as the “King James Version”).

The King James Version was by no means the first English translation. Wycliffe and Tyndale both beat the authorized version there (that attributed to Wycliffe’s appearing as early as 1382) however, this was the most significant. Unlike the translations either of Wycliffe or of Tyndale the King James Version was not to be the subject of persecution; it was commissioned by the king himself. The King James Version influenced grammar, idioms and even brought about new words to express complex theological concepts. More importantly, however, it was read and understood by the masses.

Today we have myriads of English translations and yet none penetrate the hearts of millions of English speakers because they are never proclaimed. Let us pray for the opportunity to present the Scriptures to those around us and the privilege of witnessing again the world shaken by their power.

This video will, I hope rekindle an unquenchable passion for God’s Word deep within you.

James Cuénod
Student at Wheaton College
I love Jesus, preach his Gospel, disciple his children, study his word and I am incurably passionate about the glory of God.
Inching my way towards teaching pastors in South Africa. Student at Wheaton College. Excited by Hermeneutics, Old Testament and Biblical Theology.